updated 1:38 PM UTC, Jan 24, 2013
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A Walk through brooklyn

A_Walk_Through_BrooklynA Walk Through Brooklyn by Rashaun J. Allen is a rare collection of poetry. I say that because rarely does an up and coming poet enlighten the senses of an individual the way that this author has done. The scope this poetic work examines issues of fatherlessness, death, love, sensuality, and pain. The audience that reads this book will get the opportunity to take a trip through the imagination and experience of a native Brooklynite by reading between the pages of this collection. It is not often that we (the readers) can divulge in reading the commentary on urban life from someone who has lived this experience, and can reflect on the joys, sorrows, and inconsistencies of life. Rashaun delivers the experiences of a young, educated, black man that overcame hurt and pain to discover the light the end of the tunnel. The misdirection, confusion, and ultimate success of this writer’s life are revealed after reading poem after, after poem, after poem. My personal favorites included in this collection of poetry are Tre Got a Problem, Ms. Africa, and My Crush. I look forward to reading more from this upcoming poet, but until then my appetite for delving into one black man’s psyche, and reading about a true urban experience has been satisfied after a taking A Walk Through Brooklyn.

Polish Your Writing In Less Than Ten Minutes

pencilHow many times have you read a novel and felt in the action? Great novels spike the reader's fear, anxiety, anger, laughter--even hormones.

 

They may even keep the reader glued to the pages until the wee hours of night. Stephen King and Nora Roberts make the big bucks for good reason.

Painting a picture with words demonstrates a unique talent. However, writers must study the craft--as with any skill. The story may be clean off the rack, but may still need a nice coat of wax. No worries. These five tips will help “spit-shine” that masterpiece:

Tips for writing in the third person

PentipWhen writing, most of us will choose to write in the Third Person Omniscient form which is, I believe, the most popular form of third person writing. However, when writing in the Third person you do have other options. As well as Third Person Omniscient, you also have the choice of Third Person Objective or Third Person Limited. I will explain the differences and talk about each form.  When writing in third person we are telling the readers what our characters are doing. Also, depending on which Third Person form we're writing in, reading their thoughts.

Each One Teach One

eachone Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw penned “He who can, does. He who cannot, teaches.” Was he right? Are coaches washed up athletes who didn’t make it? Perhaps all the self help gurus have all the knowledge but not enough ambition to achieve their dreams?

But wait a minute. There are the Pat Rileys, and Phil Jacksons, the Warren Buffets, the master mason and the apprentice. Either Shaw was wrong or there must be exceptions to this rule. It may be possible to master a skill and share those same methods and techniques with others. Is writing one of those skills that can be taught?

A quick google search for writing help literally yields millions of results. There are many self proclaimed gurus ready to sell you their “secrets” to success. Of course, these gurus charge a hefty fee. For a new writer the publishing world may seem like Goliath. Spending wads of cash to learn a craft might seem rational. It is not. Writing is indeed a craft. Is it possible for someone who was once unpublished, like yourself, to teach you the craft? The answer is debatable. But writer Julia Cameron offers new comers something special in her book “The Right to Write”.

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